Free-Electron Laser Science: Peter Paul Ewald Fellowships at LCLS in Stanford

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Electronic Application System

Submit your application here!

Electronic Application System

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A Scientist in the LCLS undulator-hall, SLAC, Stanford.
A Scientist in the LCLS undulator-hall, SLAC, Stanford.

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Folder Ewald-Fellowships

Folder Ewald-Fellowships

Deadline for applications is January 25, 2013

Free-electron lasers for hard X-rays create entirely new research opportunities for the natural sciences. The ultra-short and intense X-ray pulses allow scientists to unravel the atomic structure of biomolecules, to film chemical reactions, and to investigate matter under extreme conditions – just to name a few examples.

Today, there is only one laser world-wide with such capacity: LCLS at SLAC, operated by Stanford University, USA. An even more powerful free-electron laser is currently under construction in Germany. The European XFEL cooperates with DESY and international institutions. It will be operational at Hamburg and Schenefeld around 2015.

The Peter Paul Ewald-Fellowships aim at postdoctoral researchers who want to pursue novel research ideas at LCLS or the future European XFEL and who strive for a longer research stay in Stanford. The grants are made for three years – partly spent in Stanford, partly at the home institution in Germany. Funds are available for the fellow’s salary and for non-personnel costs. Details on the topical focus, the funding possibilities, and the application process are provided in the adjoining Information for Applicants.

Additionally, symposia and summer schools on free-electron laser science are supported according to the respective funding initiative.

 

Deadline for applications is January 25, 2013

Free-electron lasers for hard X-rays create entirely new research opportunities for the natural sciences. The ultra-short and intense X-ray pulses allow scientists to unravel the atomic structure of biomolecules, to film chemical reactions, and to investigate matter under extreme conditions – just to name a few examples.

Today, there is only one laser world-wide with such capacity: LCLS at SLAC, operated by Stanford University, USA. An even more powerful free-electron laser is currently under construction in Germany. The European XFEL cooperates with DESY and international institutions. It will be operational at Hamburg and Schenefeld around 2015.

The Peter Paul Ewald-Fellowships aim at postdoctoral researchers who want to pursue novel research ideas at LCLS or the future European XFEL and who strive for a longer research stay in Stanford. The grants are made for three years – partly spent in Stanford, partly at the home institution in Germany. Funds are available for the fellow’s salary and for non-personnel costs. Details on the topical focus, the funding possibilities, and the application process are provided in the adjoining Information for Applicants.

Additionally, symposia and summer schools on free-electron laser science are supported according to the respective funding initiative.