Mediathek

Herrenhausen Conference: Beyond the Intestinal Microbiome – From Signatures to Therapy

The human gastrointestinal tract is inhabited by some 100 billion microorganisms, collectively known as the microbiome. Not only do these microorganisms play an important role in helping us digest the food we eat: They also exert a strong influence on the immune and nervous system. Very little is known, though, about precisely how this takes place. At a Herrenhausen Conference on the intestinal microbiome held on 8-10 October, experts from all over the world gathered to discuss just this: The impact of the microbiome on our health, and how the latest scientific findings can be used in the fight against disease.

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The keynote speech of the Herrenhausen Conference was held by Karsten Kristiansen, a well-known scientist from the University of Copenhagen.
The keynote speech of the Herrenhausen Conference was held by Karsten Kristiansen, a well-known scientist from the University of Copenhagen.
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
Kristiansens talk was followed by the first poster session by young researchers who were provided with travel grants.
Kristiansens talk was followed by the first poster session by young researchers who were provided with travel grants.
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
Many other interesting talks were held during the three-day conference in Hanover and the audience was listening with tension.
Many other interesting talks were held during the three-day conference in Hanover and the audience was listening with tension.
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
During the first session e.g. Gabriel Nunez, University of Michigan, talked about "Linking Pathogen Virulence, the Microbiota and Disease"...
During the first session e.g. Gabriel Nunez, University of Michigan, talked about "Linking Pathogen Virulence, the Microbiota and Disease"...
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
... followed by Arthur Kaser, University of Cambridge, who reported on "Coping with stress in the intestinal crypt".
... followed by Arthur Kaser, University of Cambridge, who reported on "Coping with stress in the intestinal crypt".
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
The conference dinner was accompanied by a piece of Music: Noé Inui (violin) and Vassillis Varvaresos (piano) played Musician's symbiosis.
The conference dinner was accompanied by a piece of Music: Noé Inui (violin) and Vassillis Varvaresos (piano) played Musician's symbiosis.
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
Many different aspects were discussed, like Alexander Chervonsky's talk titled "Gender bias in autoimmunity: under control of hormones and microbes".
Many different aspects were discussed, like Alexander Chervonsky's talk titled "Gender bias in autoimmunity: under control of hormones and microbes".
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
The audience used its opportunity to discuss the talks with each speaker...
The audience used its opportunity to discuss the talks with each speaker...
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
...as the attendees used the breaks to discuss the posters with the travel grantees.
...as the attendees used the breaks to discuss the posters with the travel grantees.
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
Within the session "From bench to bedside" Max Nieuwdorp (AMC Amsterdam and University of Gothenburg) talked about "Mining for novel therapeutic bacterial strains against human disease using fecal transplantation".
Within the session "From bench to bedside" Max Nieuwdorp (AMC Amsterdam and University of Gothenburg) talked about "Mining for novel therapeutic bacterial strains against human disease using fecal transplantation".
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
Sidonia Fagarasan's talk was titled "Regulation of gut microbiota by Foxp3 and IgA".
Sidonia Fagarasan's talk was titled "Regulation of gut microbiota by Foxp3 and IgA".
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation
Charles R. Mackay, Monash University, discussed "Diet, gut microbiota and western lifestyle diseases".
Charles R. Mackay, Monash University, discussed "Diet, gut microbiota and western lifestyle diseases".
© Mirko Krenzel for Volkswagen Foundation